Archivo de la categoría: pattern

HoW iNSaNe aRe You?

Just in case you are really crazy about doing rosettes

Por si de verdad te vuelve loca hacer rosetas

KING Matrimonio grande

250×295 cm (98″ x 116″)

238 rosettes in the center and 44 in the Border

Same measurements… but with a central panel…”only” 222 rosettes in the centre

Mismas medidas…. pero con un panel central… “solo” 222 rosetas centrales

TWIN Individual

250×160 cm (98″ x 62″)

112 rosettes in the center and 32 in the Border

LAP or CRIB Mantita o Cuna

115x115cm (45″ x 45″)

25 rosettes in the center and 16 in the Border

I’m really thinking about doind a wholecloth Lap Quilt with only the border pieced. Just 16 different rosettes around a quilted center

Yo estoy pensando en hacer un quilt de regazo con solo el borde en patchwork. Solo 16 rosetas diferentes alrededor de un centro acolchado.

The moduled border can be adapted to any size you choose

El borde modulo puede ser adaptado a cualquier tamaño que hagas

Block 4

And since we are in March here is the pattern for Block 4
Y como ya estamos en Marzo, aqui está el patrón para el Bloque 4

5 comentarios

Archivado bajo King George, patchwork, pattern, quilt, SAL, tutorial

Second Block Tutorial

Tutorial en español
English tutorial
Instead of offering first the layouts of the quilt, and due to the fact that I haven’t seen any blocks in the Flickr group , I have decided to write a tutorial with the instructions to build Block 2 would also be useful for making Block 3 (just change the center). I was short of freezer paper and thought that it may be a bit of a paradox that I couldn’t sew my 1803’s rosette due to the lack of it. Then again maybe in the 1800s they have some sort of waxed paper that they stick temporarily to the fabric… I don’t know as I’m not a quilt historician. If anybody can throw some light on the subject I’ll appreciate. Anyway you can work it however you want. The tutorial is just an starting point, I’m learning as I go.
For the center.
Cut four 5cm squares (2 inches squares would work as well since we will be trimming the excess) 2 in white and 2 in your contrast fabric.

 Sew them in a checker pattern.

Trim them to make a circle

For the background of the block
Mark the center of a 13cm (5″) square by bending it.

Cut the background pattern . Cut the inner circle too. Draw the background outer line, the one that is grey. The bended lines would help you position it.

Cut the paper ring from the center pattern. Baste it to the background piece. Sew as close to the seam as you can.
Cut the center of the background piece leaving 1/8″ aprox.

Position your center under the background piece, both fabrics facing up. Be very careful with this, my center is a tiny bit off but the block is so small that you can easily see it.


Now needle turn the seam allowance and with a hidden stich attach both pieces. I try to turn 1/2″ before mi needle, in order to have more accuracy when I’m actually sewing it. Don’t work too fast here or your circle will turn faceted.

Cut the outer line of the background ( In the picture you see the melon that we will be building next)

For the melons
You can either choose to applique the two central triangles before or after you sew the melon to the background. In my mini tutorial for the melons ( posted in spanish) I sew them before, so I’ll start explaing that method.

To make the central triangles choose any applique method you will, but I’d like to share with you this method that is easy and requires no specialized equipment, only use paper, cardboard, a little water, fabric and thread .
Cut one of the triangles printed on paper, cut in the inside of the printed line and stick to a card.  The base of the triangle is not important in this model, so leave a little more of cardboard, this make it easier to me.

Cut a triangle of fabric with a scant seam allowance, especially at the tips.

Moisten the seam and bend it onto the cardboard. If necessary slightly reduce margins in the end.  Retire cardboard and compare my triangle to the  cardboard block, adjuste a bit if necessary and let dry under weight, if you  are in a hurry over a radiator.


Once dry, wet the tip and fold it into the first seam and then fold into the other. I wait till it has dry under weight. If I find it hard to fold it  I let it dry between folds.

 This triangle is ready for applique


To do the applique I place by heart the crown pattern in  the center of a  7cm (3″) square of white cloth.  I put a pin to hold the piece of applique in place and begin to sew the triangle to the background.

You can sew it with a blind stitch, but I do it with a running stitch just below the fold of the triangle.

When I get to the point I take care to sew only the upper layer of  fabric  of the triangle to the triangle.

 
For me it is faster and easier, and in pieces like these the result is quite good even if you are not too careful.

 Repeat with the next triangle.


Once the two triangles are sewn, on the back of the fabric draw each side of the crown, using the paper template that we cut earlier.

Cut two rectangles of fabric measuring 7x5cm (3×2″) and pin.

 Sew the two side seams and open the piece.

Now carefully place the block of the seam allowance, using the markings on it to position it properly.


Draw  both the exterior and the interior and trim the exterior  following the line.


If you want you can stop here but I cut out the back white cloth.

After you have completed the melon I pin center to center and one end to one end. I add a pin or two in the middle curving the pieces as I do so. I leave the other side unpinned.


Starting from the center and working to the side I start sewing, being extra careful of matching my curves. Now repeat for the other side and remember to work from center to end. Open seam and iron or press seam with your nail.

You don’t have to applique the triangles first. Cut a 7cm square (or a 3″) of your white fabric and mark seams lines for your crown.

Right side together pin one 7x5cm rectangle of your chosen fabric ( or a 3×2″) to each end of the crown. Sew each piece and open the piece when you are done.

Draw the melon using the marks for placing it. Draw the outer an inner line. Cut the outer line…

Now you have a melon that you can attach to your background in the same way as written before.

Once you have attached the melon place the central triangles and applique them using the paper crown to place them.

And now  you are done.

You can trim excess of fabric from the back as well as the seam allowances. I work with an smaller sewing allowance in my background and a bigger one in the melon and inlaid center. That way I don’t need to clip curves as my background bends well enough, yet I don’t have to fight with tiny seams as I’m always sewing to a generous seamed fabric piece ( the melon or the center). Once sewn and pressed you can trim all the seam allowances

Now I’m asking you to give it a try!

Show me your little rosettes, either here or at flickr.
List of blocks and links to patterns are here.

The quilt has only 16 different rosettes altough it looks like there are hundreds of them. I think that it’s due to the large amount of different fabrics as well as the fact that rosettes are not aligned. This is the original layout of the quilt. For this SAL I will only be drafting the pieced rosettes, releasing at least one pattern a month and a couple of options for the layout. I’m providing patterns for the original size (around 10cm) but also at a more confortable 15cm, wich is the size I’m using here.
For Block 1 use any foundation methorod or english paper piecing if you are quite new at piecework. Altough more labor intensive it’s almost imposible to go wrong with english paper piecing  and it would boost your confidence. I cut each piece in freezer paper and them sew them together. Tutorial here. And Bettina used the method depicted here with freezer paper as a foundation.
If you join the fun feel free to grab the button for the SAL and use this pattern for any crafty use. Please do not redistribute. All drafts are my copyright.

3 comentarios

Archivado bajo King George, patchwork, patrones, pattern, quilt, SAL, tutorial

Tutorial para el bloque 2

English tutorial

Tutorial en español

En lugar de ofrecer primero los diseños de la colcha, y debido al hecho de que no he visto ningun bloque en el grupo de Flickr, me he decidido a escribir un tutorial con las instrucciones para construir el Bloque 2 que también ser útil para hacer el Bloque 3 ( sólo cambia el centro). De todas formas se puede trabajar como queraís. El tutorial es sólo un punto de partida, yo tambien estoy aprendiendo a medida que avanzo.
Para el centro.

Cortar cuatro cuadrados de 5 cm ( o cuadrados de 2 pulgadas ya que se recorta el exceso) 2 en blanco y 2 en la tela de color.

Coserlos en damero.

Recortar el círculo

Para el fondo del bloque
Marcar el centro de un cuadrado de 13 cm (5 “) mediante un par de dobleces

Cortar en el papel la pieza del fondo. Recortar el círculo interior también. Dibujar en la tela la línea exterior de fondo, el que es gris. Las líneas de doblado son para ayudar a poner en su posición.

Cortar el anillo de papel del patrón del centro. Hilvanar el anillo de papel a la tela del fondo. Coser este hilvan tan cerca de la costura como sea posible. Cortar el centro de la pieza de fondo dejando 1/8″aprox.

Colocar el centro bajo la pieza de fondo, ambas telas hacia arriba. Hay que tener mucho cuidado en este paso, mi centro esta desplazado por poco mas de un milimetro, pero el bloque es tan pequeño que se puede ver fácilmente que esta descentrado

Ahora con la aguja hay que meter el margen de costura de la pieza de fondo e ir aplicando con puntada oculta las dos piezas.(Aplique inverso). Trato de anticiparme doblando para dentro 1cm o 1/2″ por delante de mi aguja, con el fin de tener más precisión cuando estoy realmente cosiendolo. No hay que trabajar esta parte demasiado rápido o el círculo quedará poligonal.

Corta la pieza exterior, en la foto lo puedes ver con el gajo que construimos en el minitutorial anterior.

Para los gajos exteriores
Se pueden aplicar los triangulos centrales de los gajos antes o despues de coser los gajos a la pieza del fondo. En el minitutorial que acabo de mencionar lo hicimos antes. Asi que ahora explicaré como unir nuestro gajo al fondo.

Tras complertar la pieza del gajo poner un alfiler uniendo los centros y otro uniendo uno de los extremos. Añadir un alfiler o dos en el centro , curvando las piezas. Dejar el otro extremo sin alfileres.


Empezando por el centro y trabajando hasta un extremo comenzar a coser, poniendo mucho cuidado en emparejar las dos curvas. Repetir la operación con el otro extremo recordando trabajar desde el centro. Abrir la pieza y planchar o marcar con la uña.

No hay porque aplicar los triángulos en primer lugar. Cortar un cuadrado de 7 cm (o de 3″) de tela blanca y con el patrón de la corona marcar los margenes de costuras laterales.

Con las caras de la tela juntas poner un alfiler a un rectángulo de 7x5cm de la tela elegida (o de 3″x2″) a cada extremo de la corona. Coser cada pieza y abrir la pieza al terminar.

Dibujar el gajo usando las marcas para ubicar su posición. Dibujar el exterior y la línea interna. Recortar la línea exterior …

Ahora tenemos otroun gajo que se puede unir al bloque con el mismo método que he descrito antes.

Una vez que está unido el gajo a la pieza central pueden aplicarse los triángulos centrales, usando la corona de papel para colocarlos.

Y ahora ya hemos terminado.

Puede recortar el exceso de tela de la parte posterior, así como los márgenes de costura. Yo he usado un margen de costura más pequeño en la pieza del fondo y uno más grande en el gajo y el centro aplicado. De esta manera no es necesario recortar las curvas ya que mi pieza de fondo se curva bastante bien, sin embargo, no hay que luchar con margenes de costuras pequeños ya que siempre coso a una pieza de tela con un margen generoso (el gajo o el centro). Una vez cosido todo y planchado, se pueden recortar los márgenes de costura.

Ahora es vuestro turno de intertarlo!

Mostrar vuestras rosetas aqui o en flickr.

5 comentarios

Archivado bajo King George, patchwork, patrones, pattern, quilt, SAL, tutorial

Bloque de Febrero

Para este mes os dejo un par de bloques. Los dos bloques son practicamente el mismo, solo con diferente centro.

Como siempre cualquier método de construcción puede ser utilizado, pero mi sugerencia es la siguiente. El centro trabajarlo en patchwork, es decir con piezas y reservar para aplicarlo posteriormente. Cortar la pieza mas grande por las lineas grises. El centro se puede aplicar directamente encima o realizar un aplique inverso ( reverse applique). Como os resulte mas sencillo. Para hacer los gajos aplicar los dos triángulos centrales y unir la corona a los dos triángulos centrales. Para montar los gajos a la pieza central en mi opinión lo mas sencillo es unir las piezas poniendo un alfiler en los bordes y en el centro y coserlas con cuidado.
Descarga aqui los patrones del bloque 2 y 3

Mini tutorial para realizar los gajos.
Para aplicar los triángulos centrales cualquier método de aplique os servirá, pero me gustaría compartir con vosotros este método que a mi me resulta sencillo y que no requiere de equipamiento especializado, solo uso papel, cartulina, un poco de agua, la tela y el hilo.
Recorto uno de los triángulos del aplique en papel, recortando por la parte interior de la linea impresa y lo pego a una cartulina. La base del triangulo no es importante en este modelo, así que dejo un poco mas de cartulina para que me sea mas fácil.

Recorto un triángulo con un sobreancho de costura no muy grande en especial en las puntas.

Humedezco el sobreancho y lo doblo sobre la cartulina. Si es necesario reduzco un poco los márgenes en la punta. Retiro la cartulina y comparo mi triángulo con el bloque de cartulina, ajusto un poco si es necesario y lo dejo secarse bajo peso, si hay prisa encima de un radiador.


Una vez seco, mojo la punta y la doblo primero hacia uno de los márgenes de costura y luego hacia el otro. Vuelvo a esperar que se seque bajo peso. Si encuentro difícil hacerlo dejo que se seque entre un doblez y otro.

Con esto queda preparado el triangulo para su aplicación

Para aplicarlos coloco a ojo el modelo de papel en el centro de un cuadrado de 7cm de tela blanca. Pongo un alfiler para sujetar la pieza de aplique en su posición y empiezo a coser el triángulo al fondo.

Podéis coserlo con puntada oculta pero yo lo hago con una puntada de hilván ( running stitch) justo por debajo del doblez de la pieza de aplique.

Cuando llego a la punta tengo cuidado de coser la capa superior del triangulo.
Para mi es mas rápido y sencillo, no hay que ser excesivamente cuidadoso y en piezas como esta el resultado es bastante bueno.
Repito la operación con el siguiente triángulo.


Una vez cosidos los dos triángulos por la parte trasera de la tela dibujo los laterales de la corona, usando el molde de papel que usamos anteriormente.

Corto dos rectángulos de tela de 7x5cm y los sujeto con alfiler.

Coso las dos piezas laterales y abro la costura

Ahora coloco con cuidado el bloque del sobreancho de costura, usando las marcas que hay sobre el para colocarlo bien.


Marco tanto el exterior como el interior y recorto por la linea exterior.


Si queréis podéis terminar aquí pero yo recorto por la parte trasera el exceso de tela blanca.

Este método lo uso cuando no tengo a mano una plancha, freezer paper y etcétera. Como os dije siempre hacia las cosas un poco a mi manera.
Y si, como podéis ver ando un poco retrasada con la costura de este bloque!

1 comentario

Archivado bajo King George, patchwork, patrones, pattern, quilt, SAL, tutorial

El Rey Jorge pasando revista a las tropas

Antes que nada me gustaría agradeceros el interés mostrado en este proyecto. Pensé que nadie me leería, que poco a poco iría subiendo los bloques y que cuando hubiera tres o cuatro a lo mejor a alguien cosía alguno. Pero la verdad es que tengo una media de doscientas visitas desde que publiqué el bloque, sobre todo gracias a Bettina que no solo fue tan amable de coser el primer bloque sino que escribió una fantástica entrada en su blog al respecto. Así que no me ha quedado otro remedio que ponerme las pilas e intentar organizar un poco el SAL. Este es el fantástico bloque que realizó Bettina con mi patrón.


Sobre el quilt:
El quilt Jorge III pasando revista a las tropas es famoso por sus apliques narrativos y debe su nombre al aplique central. Este aplique central está desplazado hacia la parte superior del quilt e incluso tapa los círculos de patchwork que forman el cuerpo de la pieza. No se sabe muy bien si se debe a que iba a ser colocado en una cama, a que se aprovecharon piezas de una obra anterior, si hubo varias manos encargadas del proyecto o si simplemente hubo un error de calculo.

Aunque debe su fama a la narrativa de sus apliques ( de la que espero poder hablar en otro post), a mi me fascinaron las 360 rosetas circulares que forman el cuerpo de la obra. Hay quien lo ha denominado el DearJane británico pero el numero de bloques diferentes es sin duda mucho mas pequeño. Apenas cuenta con 16 modelos distintos que el autor del trabajo realiza en muchísimas telas diferentes y que monta girados sin mucha atencion, ofreciendo asi mayor variedad compositiva.
Estos son los 16 modelos distintos que forman el quilt

Dos bloques se van alternando entre si formando un marco alrededor del motivo central, como ya hemos mencionado la composición esta desplazada hacia arriba. En este esquema se ve como se colocan los distintos bloques en el quilt original

El tamaño de las rosetas es de unos 10 cm con lo que podéis imaginar el tamaño de algunos de los despieces. Se encuentra en el Victoria & Albert de Londres y aunque estuvo expuesto durante la reciente exposición sobre quilts no se si ahora estará en exhibición

Sobre este SAL
Mi idea es publicar los patrones de las 16 rosetas durante este año, compartiendo al menos uno al mes. Hay algunas rosetas muy similares que pueden ser trabadas simultáneamente o con el mismo método. Además de las rosetas mi intención es ofrecería los patrones de borde o montaje de un par de samplers o de mantitas para que vuestras obras de arte puedan lucir en todo su esplendor. Si alguien se anima a hacer un quilt tamaño cama, o reproducción del original estaré encantada de dibujarle los patrones necesarios para los bordes. Igualmente si alguien quiere compartir su montaje de las rosetas con las demás, estaré encantada de ponerlo en el blog.

Los patrones incluirán las rosetas en 10cm y en 15cm. El tamaño original puede ser bastante complicado así que ¿por que no disfrutar un poco mas de la labor cosiendolos de 15cm?

Y bueno la semana que viene publicaré el patrón de febrero.

Compartir
Sin vuestra participación esto no sería un SAL así que por favor compartid conmigo vuestros progresos en el King George. Por supuesto podéis publicarlo en vuestros blogs, pero compartir conmigo los enlaces para que todos podamos disfrutarlo.

En este grupo de Flickr que cada uno puede subir sus bloquecitos. Si no tenéis cuenta en flickr os animo a que os la hagáis. Es gratuita y una manera muy cómoda de compartir las fotos de vuestras labores, además podéis usar estas fotos en vuestro blog sin que os quite el espacio de alojamiento disponible en el blog.
Por supuesto tambien podeis enviarme todas las fotos, o el link, para que yo las suba aquí y vayamos haciendo una galería.
Os dejo también un botón por si queréis incluirlo en vuestro blog con un link al SAL


Espero pronto poder ver vuestros trabajos y ver que mi esfuerzo de compartir este proyecto vale la pena.

Bloque de Enero
Muchas habéis mostrado dudas de ser capaces de coser este bloque, pero os animo a que lo probéis. El mayor inconveniente es el pequeño tamaño del bloque, pero trabajando las piezas con precisión y paciencia no tiene mayor complicación.

Pattern Block 1Yo lo hice imprimiendo el patrón en freezer paper, cortando cada pieza y planchandolo a la tela elegida. Luego las uno con alfileres y las voy cosiendo según el orden que aparece en el patrón. Con el freezer paper la pieza queda rígida y es fácil no deformar las piezas. Las líneas auxiliares solo indican que hay que coser el lado con rayitas de una pieza al lado con rayitas de la siguiente. En este tutorial podéis ver un método similar.

Otra manera de realizar el bloque de modo sencillo para las mas novatas es el english paper piecing. Es un método laborioso pero infalible para las mas inexpertas. Cortamos cada pieza en papel y cortamos una pieza de tela con margen de costura, forramos el papel con la tela hilvanandola con hilo que contraste. Una vez que están montadas las piezas las cosemos a mano, sin perforar el papel. Si el papel es un poco rigido mejor, pero cuidado que teneis que hilvanarlo a la tela y si es muy grueso ni podreis perforarlo. Os dejo este tutorial en el que podéis ver el proceso. De verdad que con este método cualquiera con paciencia puede terminar esta pieza.

Otra idea es poner el freezer paper por encima de la tela, e ir montado con el freezer paper a la vista. Aqui hay un tutorial con este metodo
Bettina realizo el suyo con una técnica de foundation paper. Sin duda la técnica mas rápida pero que puede requerir cierta experiencia. Aquí queda ilustrada

Cualquier otra técnica puede ser usada. Incluso para las más experimentadas puede resultar posible coserlo simplemente trazando las piezas en la tela. Por favor compartir conmigo los métodos que useis, asi como si encontraís tutoriales mejores que estos.Espero poder ir añadiendo tutoriales pero como he estado entretenida dibujando bloques quería compartir estos con vosotras para que os vayáis animando

Copyright etc.
Yo he dibujado estos patrones reproduciendo el original. Por supuesto podéis coser con ellos lo que queráis pero por favor especificar que son mios o de este blog. Cualquier uso artesanal esta permitido. Los patrones están aquí y son públicos así que podéis compartir el enlace o el blog con quien deseeís.

10 comentarios

Archivado bajo King George, patchwork, patrones, pattern, quilt, SAL, star, tutorial

King George SAL

Estoy fascinada por el quilt “King George III Reviewing the Troops“, que está en el Victoria and Albert Museum. Aunque el aplique es excepcional ahora mismo lo que me llama más la atención son las pequeñas rosetas de patchwork. Asi que ni corta ni perezosa me he propuesto intentar coser algunas.
Creo que el tamaño original de las rosetas es de unos 10cm, pero mi primer bloque mide 15cm.Block 1
Si quereís probar a hacerlo vosotras aquí os dejo el patrón de este bloque. En los dos tamaños para que elijaís como hacerlo. Yo lo hice con freezer paper, pero con cualquier metodo de paper piecing puede ser sencillo. En el patrón está señalado el orden de costura. Creo que es el bloque mas sencillo del quilt original, y aun asi yo he cosido el bloque de 15cm.
Si hay suficiente aceptación puedo añadir un pequeño tutorial con “freezer paper” y podemos poner las imagenes en flickr o algo asi.


Pattern Block 1

Descarga el patrón para el primer bloque del King George SAL
Download the first block for the King George SAL

Aqui habrá un indice de los bloques de este proyecto

13 comentarios

Archivado bajo King George, patchwork, patrones, pattern, quilt, SAL, tutorial

Twirling Block

Como proposito de año nuevo me he propuesto retomar el patchwork. No se si es correcto decir retomarlo o iniciarme en él, ya que mis escarceos con el patchwork han sido siempre bastante poco ortodoxos, así que quizás lo más correcto sería decir que mi proposito es aprender bien.

Me he apuntado en unas clases cercanas y ya he terminado mi primer bloque. un pequeño paso para el mundo del patchwork pero por algo se empieza. La verdad es que no sé si convertirlo en un cojín o hacer unos cuantos bloques más. Creo decantarme por el cojín para así tener una labor terminada. Pero tambien me apetece repetir el bloque, ahora que creo haberle cojido el truquillo y asi ver que con la práctica mejoro.

Twirling Block

El bloque es una twirling star, que sinceramente no elegí sino que estaba en clase y me pareció bien probarla. La verdad es que me ha gustado mucho. Por si a vosotras tambien os entra tambien el gusanillo he hecho un pdf con mi versión de la estrella para que probeís vosotros tambien a coserla. Por ahora esta solo en inglés, pero si alguien lo necesita en español, puedo traducirle las indicaciones. Es bastante sencilla, mi principal problema ha sido el centro, como no, pero bueno al final estoy contenta con el resultado.

En la versión que he dibujado yo y que os podeís descargar aparece tanto la linea interior como el extra de costura, cortarla según prefiraís, en mi clase me enseñaron a copiarla con acetato, pero creo que con “freezer paper” u otro metodo similar tambien puede quedar bien, y las muy experimentadas y con un pie de cuarto de pulgada podeís coserla directamente sin dibujar la pieza interior.

Yo lo he cosido a mano, pero por supuesto podeís tambien hacerlo a maquina. Ya me contareís que método habeís usado.

Patrón Twirling Star

Asi que si quereís descargarlos los patrones aqui están: Twirling Block 

Las telas son de Tilda y compradas en la tienda donde empecé con las clases, pero si sabeís donde encontrarlas online decirmelo e incluiré el link. Los colores son rojo y celeste porque me encanta esa combinación, pero os dejo un par de links con imagenes de otras estrellas hechas por otras quilters con telas muy diferentes para ver si os inspiran: Una estrella espectacular hecha con telas de influencia asiatica y otra con flores, puntos y rayas (me encanta combinar flores, puntos y rayas)

Por favor decidme que os parece y enviarme fotos si usaís mi patrón.

You can download the pattern for thisTwirling Star here

6 comentarios

Archivado bajo eight point, patchwork, patrones, pattern, quilt, star, tutorial